Gérard Valenduc, Patricia Vendramin, Bettina-Johanna Krings & Linda Nierling

How restructuring is changing occupations
Case study evidence from knowledge-intensive, manufacturing and service occupations

Leuven: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven 2008. Higher institute of labour studies. ISBN: 9789088360046, 196 Seiten, 19 Euro
[Introduction to the report]


TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 Introduction to the report 9
2 Research design and methodology
by Patricia Vendramin / Gérard Valenduc
11
  2.1 The purposes of occupational case studies 11
  2.2 The relevance of occupational groups as a research object 13
  2.2.1 Recent trends in research on occupations and professions 13
  2.2.2 The WORKS approach to occupations 16
  2.3 Problem setting of occupational case studies 17
  2.3.1 Work biographies, career construction and choices 17
  2.3.2 Changes in occupational identities 18
  2.3.3 Quality of work 19
  2.3.4 Learning and skills development 20
  2.3.5 Work-life balance, including household dynamics 21
  2.4 The comparative approach 21
  2.5 The selection of occupational groups in the WORKS project 23
  2.5.1 Selection criteria 23
  2.5.2 Selection of occupational groups for case studies 23
  2.5.3 Organisation of the field work and reporting process 26
  Bibliography 27
3 Occupational monograph Designers in the clothing industry
by Gérard Valenduc / Maïra Muchnik
29
  3.1 Description of the occupational group, main features 29
  3.2 Work biographies 32
  3.3 Changes in occupational identities 36
  3.4 Learning and skills development 39
  3.5 Quality of work 40
  3.6 Work-life balance 42
  3.7 Gender 43
  3.8 Conclusions and trends 45
  Bibliography 46
4 Occupational monograph R&D workers in information and communication technology
by Bettina-Johanna Krings / Linda Nierling
49
  4.1 Description of the occupational group, main features 49
  4.2 Work biographies 53
  4.3 Changes in occupational identities 56
  4.4 Learning and skills development 59
  4.5 Quality of work 62
  4.6 Work-life balance 64
  4.7 Gender 65
  4.8 Conclusions and trends 68
  Bibliography 69
5 Occupational monograph IT professionals in software services
by Gérard Valenduc
71
  5.1 Description of the occupational group, main features 73
  5.2 Work biographies 78
  5.3 Changes in occupational identities 84
  5.4 Learning and skills development 87
  5.5 Quality of work 90
  5.6 Work-life balance 91
  5.7 The gender dimension 93
  5.8 Conclusions and trends 95
  Bibliography 96
6 Occupational monograph Production workers in the clothing and food industries
by Linda Nierling / Bettina-Johanna Krings
99
  6.1 Description of the occupational group, main features 99
  6.2 Work biographies 103
  6.3 Changes in occupational identities 106
  6.4 Learning and skills development 109
  6.5 Quality of work 111
  6.6 Work-life balance 112
  5.7 Gender 114
  6.8 Conclusions and trends 117
  Bibliography 117
7 Occupational monograph Logistics workers
by Bettina-Johanna Krings / Linda Nierling
119
  7.1 Description of the occupational group, main features 119
  7.2 Work biographies 123
  7.3 Changes in occupational identities 126
  7.4 Learning and skills development 128
  7.5 Quality of work 129
  7.6 Work-life balance 131
  7.7 Gender 132
  7.8 Conclusions and trends 135
  Bibliography 137
8 Occupational monograph Front office employees in customer relationships in public services
by Maïra Muchnik / Gérard Valenduc
139
  8.1 Description of the occupational group, main features 139
  8.2 Work biographies 144
  8.3 Changes in occupational identities 146
  8.4 Learning and skills development 149
  8.5 Quality of work 150
  8.6 Work-life balance 152
  8.7 Gender 132
  8.8 Conclusions and trends 157
  Bibliography 157
9 Conclusions of the comparative analysis
by Bettina-Johanna Krings / Linda Nierling / Gérard Valenduc
159
  9.1 Occupational groups as a research object 159
  9.1.1 Global value chains, knowledge-based economies and occupational groups 159
  9.1.2 Clusters of occupational groups 161
  9.2 Occupational groups as a means for studying impacts of restructuring on individuals empirical findings 163
  9.2.1 Impacts of restructuring on changes in occupational groups 163
  9.2.2 Relations between business functions and occupational groups 166
  9.2.3 Quality of work and quality of life 169
  9.2.4 Country differences 173
  9.3 Changes in occupational identities 176
  9.3.1 Knowledge-based creative occupations 176
  9.3.2 Manufacturing occupations 178
  9.3.3 Service occupations 179
  9.4 Learning and skills development 149
  9.4.1 Specific gender issues in occupational groups 182
  9.4.2 Common transversal trends 185
  9.4.3 Gender relations in stability and motion final observations 189
  Bibliography 191
Annex: Guidelines for individual interviews 193
  1. Thematic guidelines for individual interviews 193
  2. Key data questionnaire 196

 

Erstellt am: 20.01.2009 - Kommentare an: webmaster